Welcome Aboard The RMS Titanic – Or The Met As She Likes To Be Called

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28 Responses

  1. ideb8 says:

    Yes, very true. Come on BHH, go for it.

    Better to be remembered as “repairer of the breach” than as some hollow Rome fiddler boasting of the fastest reduction in dodgy 30-year crime stats.

    And start by admitting to & exposing any past dishonesties, bullying or corruption in the Met.

    Clear the Augean stables so that the best of the 99% of honest Met officers can at last get to work, rebuilding the ancient ruins – before they collapse completely.

  2. ideb8 says:

    Yes, very true. Come on BHH, go for it.

    Better to be remembered as “repairer of the breach” than as some hollow Rome fiddler boasting of the fastest reduction in dodgy 30-year crime stats.

    And start by admitting to & exposing any past dishonesties, bullying or corruption in the Met.

    Clear the Augean stables so that the best of the 99% of honest Met officers can at last get to work, rebuilding the ancient ruins – before they collapse completely.

  3. Moonraker says:

    In my 30 years I encountered many, many bosses but can only recall one leader at Inspector or above. He was a man who led from the front and did not shy away from that responsibility, he would support you when he knew that what you had done was right and if that meant upsetting senior officers he would. His shift would have followed him into Hell. Needless to say he never got further than Inspector all the others for the most part were duckers and divers unable or unwilling to make a decision. Sadly I suspect far too many take the promotion road when they actually realised that they are unsuited or unable to do the job they originally joined.

    • I worked with one Det Supt who was an undoubted leader and had no reservations about expressing his views. He fiercely defended the chaps when they deserved it, or gave out bollockings to end all bollockings if they were deserved. On the whole I would agree though, very few leaders above the rank of Inspector

  4. Moonraker says:

    In my 30 years I encountered many, many bosses but can only recall one leader at Inspector or above. He was a man who led from the front and did not shy away from that responsibility, he would support you when he knew that what you had done was right and if that meant upsetting senior officers he would. His shift would have followed him into Hell. Needless to say he never got further than Inspector all the others for the most part were duckers and divers unable or unwilling to make a decision. Sadly I suspect far too many take the promotion road when they actually realised that they are unsuited or unable to do the job they originally joined.

    • I worked with one Det Supt who was an undoubted leader and had no reservations about expressing his views. He fiercely defended the chaps when they deserved it, or gave out bollockings to end all bollockings if they were deserved. On the whole I would agree though, very few leaders above the rank of Inspector

  5. kenord says:

    I wouldn’t cross the street to speak to any of the so called bosses I came in contact with during my service they were not fit to lick my boots never mind lead men or make decisions.

  6. kenord says:

    I wouldn’t cross the street to speak to any of the so called bosses I came in contact with during my service they were not fit to lick my boots never mind lead men or make decisions.

  7. Lord Dear had it right. Too many managers not enough leaders. To quote the man himself:-

    “The basic problem is leadership. The service has created, trained and promoted to its top ranks managers, rather than leaders. The roots of this go deep, certainly to a decision taken at the Police Staff College in the early 1990s to drop the focus on leadership on the grounds that it was “divisive and elitist” and concentrate instead on management. The police, like much of the public sector, remain preoccupied with the management ethic, ignoring the words of Viscount Slim p a noted leader in both the army and the commercial world – that “managers are necessary, leaders are essential”.

    The result is a service that is too risk averse, frequently process driven and displays all the defensive attitudes of the besieged. Of course there are notable exceptions, but the picture among the senior ranks overall is depressing and getting worse”.

    http://thinbluelineuk.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/police-leadership-time-for-new-moral.html

    • I couldn’t have put it any better than that, thank you. Bramshill has an awful lot to answer for, between Bramshill and the other controversial Think Tanks such momentous policies are born.

  8. Lord Dear had it right. Too many managers not enough leaders. To quote the man himself:-

    “The basic problem is leadership. The service has created, trained and promoted to its top ranks managers, rather than leaders. The roots of this go deep, certainly to a decision taken at the Police Staff College in the early 1990s to drop the focus on leadership on the grounds that it was “divisive and elitist” and concentrate instead on management. The police, like much of the public sector, remain preoccupied with the management ethic, ignoring the words of Viscount Slim p a noted leader in both the army and the commercial world – that “managers are necessary, leaders are essential”.

    The result is a service that is too risk averse, frequently process driven and displays all the defensive attitudes of the besieged. Of course there are notable exceptions, but the picture among the senior ranks overall is depressing and getting worse”.

    http://thinbluelineuk.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/police-leadership-time-for-new-moral.html

    • I couldn’t have put it any better than that, thank you. Bramshill has an awful lot to answer for, between Bramshill and the other controversial Think Tanks such momentous policies are born.

  9. ideb8 says:

    “Caught red-handed: Why we can’t count on Police Recorded Crime statistics”

    HoC PASC 13th report of session 2013-4 – excerpts:

    1. “We are indebted to PC Patrick for his courage in speaking out, in fulfilment of his duty to the highest standards of public service, despite intense pressures to the contrary.”

    23. “This inquiry was prompted by the concerns expressed by PC James Patrick, a serving officer in the Metropolitan Police with involvement in data analysis”

    92. [PASC is] “..grateful to PC James Patrick, a serving police officer with the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), for his courage in coming forward to voice his concerns. This was instrumental in prompting this inquiry”

    99. “We recommend that Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary should investigate the Metropolitan Police Service in respect of the treatment of PC Patrick and review the internal processes and procedures of the police for dealing with whistleblowers, in order to ensure that they are treated fairly and compassionately. We further recommend that the Home Affairs Committee should inquire into these matters to ensure that whistleblowers in any police force are treated fairly and with respect and care. We have grave doubts that the Metropolitan Police Service has treated PC Patrick fairly or with respect and care.”

    Online version of report:
    http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201314/cmselect/cmpubadm/760/76002.htm

    Downloadable pdf version:
    http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201314/cmselect/cmpubadm/760/760.pdf

    Main points of report, listed:
    http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/public-administration-select-committee/news/crime-stats-substantive

    Thursday 10 April Mr Bernard Jenkin to launch report:
    http://www.parliamentlive.tv/Main/Player.aspx?meetingId=15227

  10. ideb8 says:

    “Caught red-handed: Why we can’t count on Police Recorded Crime statistics”

    HoC PASC 13th report of session 2013-4 – excerpts:

    1. “We are indebted to PC Patrick for his courage in speaking out, in fulfilment of his duty to the highest standards of public service, despite intense pressures to the contrary.”

    23. “This inquiry was prompted by the concerns expressed by PC James Patrick, a serving officer in the Metropolitan Police with involvement in data analysis”

    92. [PASC is] “..grateful to PC James Patrick, a serving police officer with the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), for his courage in coming forward to voice his concerns. This was instrumental in prompting this inquiry”

    99. “We recommend that Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary should investigate the Metropolitan Police Service in respect of the treatment of PC Patrick and review the internal processes and procedures of the police for dealing with whistleblowers, in order to ensure that they are treated fairly and compassionately. We further recommend that the Home Affairs Committee should inquire into these matters to ensure that whistleblowers in any police force are treated fairly and with respect and care. We have grave doubts that the Metropolitan Police Service has treated PC Patrick fairly or with respect and care.”

    Online version of report:
    http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201314/cmselect/cmpubadm/760/76002.htm

    Downloadable pdf version:
    http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201314/cmselect/cmpubadm/760/760.pdf

    Main points of report, listed:
    http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/public-administration-select-committee/news/crime-stats-substantive

    Thursday 10 April Mr Bernard Jenkin to launch report:
    http://www.parliamentlive.tv/Main/Player.aspx?meetingId=15227

  11. Bob Southgate says:

    Alan, one area where it is going badly wrong in the Met is the increased use of the unsatisfactory performance procedures being used against officers who are off sick. In the last 2 weeks I have heard of 2 instances from reliable sources (both know the individual officers concerned) where one traffic officer who broke his leg on duty ( a spiral fracture, very complex) has been served UPP papers. This officer went out on a bike with new unscrubbed tyres and crashed. When the federation challenged the Met and asked why tyres were not scrubbed prior to fitment the response was the cost would be too great!!

    The other officer had had some health issues and was then admitted to hospital with a severe bout of shingles. While in hospital he suffered a stroke. He was visited by his chief inspector who at the end of the visit informed the officer he was now subject to UPP because of his sickness!

    I trust both sources 100% and I suspect that UPP is being abused on a frequent basis within the Met.

    • Interesting, I hadn’t heard of that Bob, but if true would be a serious abuse of power, 2 disgraceful examples

      • Bob Southgate says:

        Yes they are Alan. The source who told me about the traffic officer retired last August at 55 with 23 years service. He had sustained a number of injuries on duty and he should have been medically retired. He had been off for some time because of his injuries (which were sustained on duty) and he had been told UPP was being considered against him. I’m sure the federation could supply info on how this process is being totally abused. Maybe an FOI is in order 🙂

  12. Bob Southgate says:

    Alan, one area where it is going badly wrong in the Met is the increased use of the unsatisfactory performance procedures being used against officers who are off sick. In the last 2 weeks I have heard of 2 instances from reliable sources (both know the individual officers concerned) where one traffic officer who broke his leg on duty ( a spiral fracture, very complex) has been served UPP papers. This officer went out on a bike with new unscrubbed tyres and crashed. When the federation challenged the Met and asked why tyres were not scrubbed prior to fitment the response was the cost would be too great!!

    The other officer had had some health issues and was then admitted to hospital with a severe bout of shingles. While in hospital he suffered a stroke. He was visited by his chief inspector who at the end of the visit informed the officer he was now subject to UPP because of his sickness!

    I trust both sources 100% and I suspect that UPP is being abused on a frequent basis within the Met.

    • Interesting, I hadn’t heard of that Bob, but if true would be a serious abuse of power, 2 disgraceful examples

      • Bob Southgate says:

        Yes they are Alan. The source who told me about the traffic officer retired last August at 55 with 23 years service. He had sustained a number of injuries on duty and he should have been medically retired. He had been off for some time because of his injuries (which were sustained on duty) and he had been told UPP was being considered against him. I’m sure the federation could supply info on how this process is being totally abused. Maybe an FOI is in order 🙂

  13. Sam says:

    Bosses or leaders?

    The Peter Proniple suggests that people will tend to be promoted until they reach their “position of incompetence”. In the police I think that in a lot of cases the opposite was true. The incompetent were promoted out of harms way meaning that many competent leaders lost out on the promotion they deserved.

    • Sam says:

      Excuse my fat fingers, the above should have read ‘The Peter Principle’

    • I have made that same point several times before, Promote ’em to get rid of ’em. Got so bad Met had to bring in a policy that if you recommended someone for promotion you had to keep them for a while after promotion.

  14. Sam says:

    Bosses or leaders?

    The Peter Proniple suggests that people will tend to be promoted until they reach their “position of incompetence”. In the police I think that in a lot of cases the opposite was true. The incompetent were promoted out of harms way meaning that many competent leaders lost out on the promotion they deserved.

    • Sam says:

      Excuse my fat fingers, the above should have read ‘The Peter Principle’

    • I have made that same point several times before, Promote ’em to get rid of ’em. Got so bad Met had to bring in a policy that if you recommended someone for promotion you had to keep them for a while after promotion.

  1. April 8, 2014

    […] I must thank my good friend Dai for the inspiration for this post. There we were mulling over the problems that the Met have caused for the rest of the Policing World, each with the beverage of our choice, a Guinness for him and a White Wine…  […]

  2. April 8, 2014

    […] I must thank my good friend Dai for the inspiration for this post. There we were mulling over the problems that the Met have caused for the rest of the Policing World, each with the beverage of our choice, a Guinness for him and a White Wine…  […]

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