TJ is Totally F

You may also like...

13 Responses

  1. Tanya says:

    I’d be intrigued to hear where/what “the further evidence” is/came from. Murder seems an inappropriate charge given the need for MR & AR.

  2. Paul Freeman says:

    Excellent post. I was an AFO for a few years and the topic of surrendering our blue cards cropped up from time to time. Two issues always seemed to determine the decision to carry on with our, admittedly voluntary, AFO duties. One was the belief that it was a duty we had applied for, been trained for and a lot of time and money had been invested in ensuring we were fit for purpose and accordingly that we should continue to perform the role. The other – rather less admirable view put forward by some officers – was that by surrendering their AFO authority, they might miss out on overtime, lose kudos, or God forbid, have to return to the mean streets and do actual police work.

    I realise that the second point paints a less than flattering view of a very tiny percentage of AFO’s, but I personally heard it raised more than once. Equally, and by way of balancing things up a little, I should say that the vast majority of AFO’s I ever worked with, was trained by etc, were thoroughly decent people who were painfully aware that the nature of their role meant that one day they may be required to take a shot that proved fatal, and all the stress that such a decision would bring to them, their family and friends and their colleagues.

    Personally, I would love it if every AFO, SFO etc said ‘enough is enough’ and handed their blue cards in. I am in no way advocating that officers are given guaranteed immunity from prosecution if it is shown that they acted unlawfully – that would be a nonsense and do nothing to give the public confidence that we can be trusted. However, I am sick and tired of seeing cases like that of E7 becoming political and used by the likes of Keith Vaz to score points.

    The police service has being taken a huge beating at the hands of Mrs May etc, and yet there is no recognition at all when good work is done. Perhaps having their Protection Officers armed with just a baton, CS spray and a set of ‘cuffs might focus their mind a little when it all goes pear shaped. Oh! I should also say that I realise that we have very, very rarely had to use firearms in the course of protecting the Royals, politicians etc – possibly only in The Mall during the attempted of Princess Anne all those years ago – but every potential bad guy out there knows that those tasked with such protection duties carry at least one firearm as tactical option, and one has to wonder just how many potential attackers and would be assassins have decided against action knowing that they would be facing potentially deadly force.

    • Thank you Paul, an honest, well-balanced and clearly heart-felt response. I can only hope that this case proves to be the catalyst for putting things right and having a proper support framework in place.

  3. Paul Freeman says:

    Excellent post. I was an AFO for a few years and the topic of surrendering our blue cards cropped up from time to time. Two issues always seemed to determine the decision to carry on with our, admittedly voluntary, AFO duties. One was the belief that it was a duty we had applied for, been trained for and a lot of time and money had been invested in ensuring we were fit for purpose and accordingly that we should continue to perform the role. The other – rather less admirable view put forward by some officers – was that by surrendering their AFO authority, they might miss out on overtime, lose kudos, or God forbid, have to return to the mean streets and do actual police work.

    I realise that the second point paints a less than flattering view of a very tiny percentage of AFO’s, but I personally heard it raised more than once. Equally, and by way of balancing things up a little, I should say that the vast majority of AFO’s I ever worked with, was trained by etc, were thoroughly decent people who were painfully aware that the nature of their role meant that one day they may be required to take a shot that proved fatal, and all the stress that such a decision would bring to them, their family and friends and their colleagues.

    Personally, I would love it if every AFO, SFO etc said ‘enough is enough’ and handed their blue cards in. I am in no way advocating that officers are given guaranteed immunity from prosecution if it is shown that they acted unlawfully – that would be a nonsense and do nothing to give the public confidence that we can be trusted. However, I am sick and tired of seeing cases like that of E7 becoming political and used by the likes of Keith Vaz to score points.

    The police service has being taken a huge beating at the hands of Mrs May etc, and yet there is no recognition at all when good work is done. Perhaps having their Protection Officers armed with just a baton, CS spray and a set of ‘cuffs might focus their mind a little when it all goes pear shaped. Oh! I should also say that I realise that we have very, very rarely had to use firearms in the course of protecting the Royals, politicians etc – possibly only in The Mall during the attempted of Princess Anne all those years ago – but every potential bad guy out there knows that those tasked with such protection duties carry at least one firearm as tactical option, and one has to wonder just how many potential attackers and would be assassins have decided against action knowing that they would be facing potentially deadly force.

    • Thank you Paul, an honest, well-balanced and clearly heart-felt response. I can only hope that this case proves to be the catalyst for putting things right and having a proper support framework in place.

  4. lambtonwyrm says:

    Again it seems to be that when it comes to police officers they are guilty until proven innocent. Senior management provide no support, in fact quite the opposite at times. They are to ready to hang the officer out to dry, believing any version of accounts apart from the officer’s and distance themselves incase it has an effect on their career.
    Politicians apply their hindight qualifications to explain exactly how it should have taken place and use the case for their own purpose. They conveniently forget the split second decision that had to be made.
    BHH & senior management need to remember they have a duty of care and should do all they can to support officers not condemn & forget them.

  5. lambtonwyrm says:

    Again it seems to be that when it comes to police officers they are guilty until proven innocent. Senior management provide no support, in fact quite the opposite at times. They are to ready to hang the officer out to dry, believing any version of accounts apart from the officer’s and distance themselves incase it has an effect on their career.
    Politicians apply their hindight qualifications to explain exactly how it should have taken place and use the case for their own purpose. They conveniently forget the split second decision that had to be made.
    BHH & senior management need to remember they have a duty of care and should do all they can to support officers not condemn & forget them.

  1. August 1, 2014

    […] Quite a few of you will need no explanation for that.Where do I begin?  […]

  2. August 1, 2014

    […] Quite a few of you will need no explanation for that.Where do I begin?  […]

  3. August 1, 2014

    […] Quite a few of you will need no explanation for that.Where do I begin?  […]

  4. August 1, 2014

    […] Quite a few of you will need no explanation for that.Where do I begin?  […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: