Stop And Search To Be Replaced By Slap n Tickle?

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6 Responses

  1. Moonraker says:

    I agree with a lot of what you say BUT I found that simply treating people the way you yourself would expect to be treated made a big difference. The problem is not generally the Bobby on the beat it is those in Ivory Towers. If you have not read ‘The Untouchables’ I commend it to you. Something is very rotton at the core of British policing.

  2. Moonraker says:

    I agree with a lot of what you say BUT I found that simply treating people the way you yourself would expect to be treated made a big difference. The problem is not generally the Bobby on the beat it is those in Ivory Towers. If you have not read ‘The Untouchables’ I commend it to you. Something is very rotton at the core of British policing.

  3. I agree wholeheartedly about treating people the way you would wish to be treated, that helps no end.. I am aware of that book and its authors, thank you

  4. I agree wholeheartedly about treating people the way you would wish to be treated, that helps no end.. I am aware of that book and its authors, thank you

  5. davidbfpo says:

    ‘Slap & Tickle’ is actually far more appropriate for what has been happening already with Stop & Search. Here is a sentence from the HMIC report: ‘we found that police use of stop and search powers is too often ineffective in tackling crime and procedurally incorrect, thereby threatening the legitimacy of the police’.

    From: http://www.hmic.gov.uk/publication/stop-and-search-powers-20130709/

    I shall leave aside my doubts about the HMIC for now. No wonder the police service nationally are – once again – trying to “dig themselves out of a hole” with new IT, training and more.

    Mark Easton’s recent column refers to HMIC finding ‘an “alarming” 27% of stop and searches in which there were no reasonable grounds to conduct the search’. From: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-25657749

    This is a useful academic commentary, with many links, although the title is off putting: http://blog.policy.manchester.ac.uk/featured/2014/01/police-are-the-real-stop-and-search-offenders/

    I suspect you the author and many readers know Stop & Search CAN be effective in tackling some crime, especially street robbery and activity around ‘hot spots’. We also know it is used disproportionately in certain places, notably the inner cities and against minorities.

    Even serving police officers immersed in the issues acknowledge that all too often Stop & Search is THE default tactical option in directed operations, without any real consideration of the benefits and costs.

    The value of Stop & Search is reduced by the apparent lack of arrests and property / weapons found; I say apparent as the statistics on this somehow have not been collected.

    At least one force, the West Midlands, claims success after retraining; yes I am mindful of police PR! ‘There was a 30 per cent cut in the numbers for November – the first month since the phased training started for which figures are available – while the proportion arrested rose from 12 to 33 per cent’.

    See: http://www.expressandstar.com/news/2014/01/12/stop-searches-on-west-midlands-streets-down-by-thousands/

  6. davidbfpo says:

    ‘Slap & Tickle’ is actually far more appropriate for what has been happening already with Stop & Search. Here is a sentence from the HMIC report: ‘we found that police use of stop and search powers is too often ineffective in tackling crime and procedurally incorrect, thereby threatening the legitimacy of the police’.

    From: http://www.hmic.gov.uk/publication/stop-and-search-powers-20130709/

    I shall leave aside my doubts about the HMIC for now. No wonder the police service nationally are – once again – trying to “dig themselves out of a hole” with new IT, training and more.

    Mark Easton’s recent column refers to HMIC finding ‘an “alarming” 27% of stop and searches in which there were no reasonable grounds to conduct the search’. From: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-25657749

    This is a useful academic commentary, with many links, although the title is off putting: http://blog.policy.manchester.ac.uk/featured/2014/01/police-are-the-real-stop-and-search-offenders/

    I suspect you the author and many readers know Stop & Search CAN be effective in tackling some crime, especially street robbery and activity around ‘hot spots’. We also know it is used disproportionately in certain places, notably the inner cities and against minorities.

    Even serving police officers immersed in the issues acknowledge that all too often Stop & Search is THE default tactical option in directed operations, without any real consideration of the benefits and costs.

    The value of Stop & Search is reduced by the apparent lack of arrests and property / weapons found; I say apparent as the statistics on this somehow have not been collected.

    At least one force, the West Midlands, claims success after retraining; yes I am mindful of police PR! ‘There was a 30 per cent cut in the numbers for November – the first month since the phased training started for which figures are available – while the proportion arrested rose from 12 to 33 per cent’.

    See: http://www.expressandstar.com/news/2014/01/12/stop-searches-on-west-midlands-streets-down-by-thousands/

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