Reform

Last Updated on June 9, 2016 by RetiredAndAngry

No, not the legendary Think Tank, but Police Reform.

Where are we with Police Reform?  Quite honestly I’ve had enough of hearing about it, and I’m somewhat bemused by it.

In 2010 we were introduced to Reform because it was a necessary part of the Austerity Programme, the Police Service needed to be ‘Reformed’ to save the country money and contribute towards fixing the carnage caused by greedy bankers.

What a load of bollocks.

So, what IS Reform?

The Oxford Dictionary defines Reform thus;

Make changes in something, (especially an institution or practice), in order to improve it:

‘the Bill will reform the tax system’

So where have the government “Reforms” improved the Police Service?

Police and Crime Commissioners?  I don’t see any improvement over the old Police Authorities.  They may possibly save money, but are they better?

Rationalising the National Police Air Service.  What has this improved?

Almost 20,000 fewer Police Officers in England and Wales.  What has that actually improved?

Fewer Traffic Police patrolling our roads?  Any improvements there?

Fewer detectives investigating more crimes, an improvement?

Police Officers working into their 60s after the government, with the assistance of Tom Winsor, ‘Reformed’ their Pension Scheme.  This is an improvement how?

I could go on, but I won’t.  Please feel free to add further examples of government ‘Improvements’ in the Comments section below, every single one will be published.

I thank you, obliged.

3 comments on “Reform

  1. I find it really irksome the misuse of words. The misuse of reform has been a bugbear of mine for years now. Politicians are the worst for it. Reform sounds better than cost cutting change, but that is what they really meant by reform, when applied to the Police or other public service.
    There are lots of words which are gradually being changed by misuse, another political favourite is refute, which should mean disprove by evidence but when a politician says it, it means ‘I deny that allegation’ (normally because it is true) in the hope the press will report that politician X has refuted the allegation against him/her.

  2. Another one that bugs me is the gradual devaluing of the title of Officer, once it meant somebody with real responsibility, now it is used for many people who only have very minor responsibility and powers.
    I have very great respect for PCSO’s, but they are not Police Officers and I feel the use of the word Officers in their title was intended to cause confusion and give a false impression of Police strengths.

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