‘Independent’ child abuse inquiries: A question of trust?

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27 Responses

  1. cathyfox says:

    Reblogged this on cathyfox and commented:
    Chris Hobbs excellent article on the problems facing the police as regards child abuse. The honest police are desperately needed to come forward and tell the truth over what has happened in the past and what is happening now. The trail to the top of the orders chain needs to be followed to find out what has gone wrong.
    An issue which is not mentioned is whether CEOP being moved to the National Crime Agency (NCA) is a good move and whether the NCA can be trusted.

  2. cathyfox says:

    Reblogged this on cathyfox and commented:
    Chris Hobbs excellent article on the problems facing the police as regards child abuse. The honest police are desperately needed to come forward and tell the truth over what has happened in the past and what is happening now. The trail to the top of the orders chain needs to be followed to find out what has gone wrong.
    An issue which is not mentioned is whether CEOP being moved to the National Crime Agency (NCA) is a good move and whether the NCA can be trusted.

  3. pippakin says:

    Reblogged this on Thinking Out Loud and commented:
    Very good I hope more retired policemen will report their experiences

  4. pippakin says:

    Reblogged this on Thinking Out Loud and commented:
    Very good I hope more retired policemen will report their experiences

  5. artmanjosephgrech says:

    One f the most important statements I have read in many years, The following was the response of the Prime Minister two questions this morning. There is need to get the Leader of the Labour Party and the Shadow Home Secretary to confirm their agreement with the position of the Prime Minister.

    Duncan Hames (Chippenham) (LD):
    Last June, I asked the Prime Minister if he was satisfied with police investigations into organised child sexual abuse. By November, the Home Secretary acknowledged that years ago there might have been a cover-up. This week, we learned that the Met itself has identified as many as 14 cover-ups. Now that we have a judge-led inquiry, is it not time we treated this scandal, in the words of the Independent Police Complaints Commission, as
    “high level corruption of the most serious nature”?
    It went to the very core of the British state.

    The Prime Minister:
    My hon. Friend is right to say how serious this is. It is right that not only is there an Independent Police Complaints Commission investigation into what happened in the police force, but that a separate part of the Metropolitan police is carrying out an in-depth investigation, Operation Fairbank, into what happened. Added to that, we now have the overarching Justice Goddard review to look at institutional failings in discovering child sexual abuse. What I would say to my hon. Friend and others in the House who I know are very interested in this issue is that we will do everything we can to get to the bottom of what happened. Anyone who is worried about whether people will be prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act for coming forward with information should be reassured by the assurances that have been given by the Attorney-General and the Home Secretary. It is in everybody’s interest that we get absolutely to the bottom of what happened. If people should be punished for their failures, they should be.

    Mr Tom Watson (West Bromwich East) (Lab):
    This week it was revealed that a second criminal inquiry into a former Member of this House, Sir Cyril Smith, had been closed down by senior police officers, and I believe that there are other examples of cover-ups which are yet to be revealed. Notwithstanding the reassurances from the Home Secretary, will the Prime Minister please give a cast-iron guarantee that former public officials with knowledge of the cover-ups are given full whistleblower protections

    The Prime Minister:
    I am grateful to the hon. Gentleman for asking that question, which I think comes down to three separate questions. There is concern about whether people will be prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act. In terms of people giving evidence to the Goddard review, Justice Goddard is perfectly able to ask the Attorney-General—as has happened in the case of all previous commissions of inquiry of this type—to make sure that no one can incriminate themselves when they give evidence, and I am sure that that will happen. In terms of giving evidence to the IPCC inquiry, the Home Secretary has given very clear guidance. And in terms of disclosure to the press, the Attorney-General said very recently that it was highly unlikely that it would ever be in the public interest for someone who revealed wrongdoing to be subject to prosecution. I am absolutely clear about the fact that I do not want anyone to be prosecuted for uncovering wrongdoing in such a way, and I hope that the hon. Gentleman will take that in the spirit in which it was meant.

  6. artmanjosephgrech says:

    One f the most important statements I have read in many years, The following was the response of the Prime Minister two questions this morning. There is need to get the Leader of the Labour Party and the Shadow Home Secretary to confirm their agreement with the position of the Prime Minister.

    Duncan Hames (Chippenham) (LD):
    Last June, I asked the Prime Minister if he was satisfied with police investigations into organised child sexual abuse. By November, the Home Secretary acknowledged that years ago there might have been a cover-up. This week, we learned that the Met itself has identified as many as 14 cover-ups. Now that we have a judge-led inquiry, is it not time we treated this scandal, in the words of the Independent Police Complaints Commission, as
    “high level corruption of the most serious nature”?
    It went to the very core of the British state.

    The Prime Minister:
    My hon. Friend is right to say how serious this is. It is right that not only is there an Independent Police Complaints Commission investigation into what happened in the police force, but that a separate part of the Metropolitan police is carrying out an in-depth investigation, Operation Fairbank, into what happened. Added to that, we now have the overarching Justice Goddard review to look at institutional failings in discovering child sexual abuse. What I would say to my hon. Friend and others in the House who I know are very interested in this issue is that we will do everything we can to get to the bottom of what happened. Anyone who is worried about whether people will be prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act for coming forward with information should be reassured by the assurances that have been given by the Attorney-General and the Home Secretary. It is in everybody’s interest that we get absolutely to the bottom of what happened. If people should be punished for their failures, they should be.

    Mr Tom Watson (West Bromwich East) (Lab):
    This week it was revealed that a second criminal inquiry into a former Member of this House, Sir Cyril Smith, had been closed down by senior police officers, and I believe that there are other examples of cover-ups which are yet to be revealed. Notwithstanding the reassurances from the Home Secretary, will the Prime Minister please give a cast-iron guarantee that former public officials with knowledge of the cover-ups are given full whistleblower protections

    The Prime Minister:
    I am grateful to the hon. Gentleman for asking that question, which I think comes down to three separate questions. There is concern about whether people will be prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act. In terms of people giving evidence to the Goddard review, Justice Goddard is perfectly able to ask the Attorney-General—as has happened in the case of all previous commissions of inquiry of this type—to make sure that no one can incriminate themselves when they give evidence, and I am sure that that will happen. In terms of giving evidence to the IPCC inquiry, the Home Secretary has given very clear guidance. And in terms of disclosure to the press, the Attorney-General said very recently that it was highly unlikely that it would ever be in the public interest for someone who revealed wrongdoing to be subject to prosecution. I am absolutely clear about the fact that I do not want anyone to be prosecuted for uncovering wrongdoing in such a way, and I hope that the hon. Gentleman will take that in the spirit in which it was meant.

  7. card2 says:

    Balderdash. A true constable would arrest those obstructing him in his duty. The OSA is the least of a delayed whistleblower cop. Treason, Misprisoon of Treason and concealing knowledge of crime would be more relevant.

  8. card2 says:

    Balderdash. A true constable would arrest those obstructing him in his duty. The OSA is the least of a delayed whistleblower cop. Treason, Misprisoon of Treason and concealing knowledge of crime would be more relevant.

  9. card2 says:

    I took legal advice on this in 1982 ten years after I resigned police. It took the solicitor a long while. But eventually he said that the office of constable is retained unto death. The power to arrest the chief constable for obstructing me in my inquiries ten years after I left police was retained.

    The next test was early 90s when I asked New Zealand Police to help my inquiries. They did so. And provided me with the answers plus informed me that Scotland Yard Interpol Liaison section had tried to persuade NZ Police not to comply with my request. This is something IPCC inquiry may now be looking into re Met cover ups.

    Not long after the NZ Police helped I received a letter from a church in NZ. The church used by the decd who died Suffolk 1972. And whether NZ Police put them up to it I don’t know. But they, by whomsoever and in whatsoever way, “Charged” me again as the constable in the case to discharge my duty faithfully only unto law.

    After my legal advice 1982 it was seven years later I discovered new evidence. I contacted the solicitor who had even secured backup files at his home. His secretary said what a coincidence he has just been invited to public office as a District Judge so is ending his practice !

  10. card2 says:

    I took legal advice on this in 1982 ten years after I resigned police. It took the solicitor a long while. But eventually he said that the office of constable is retained unto death. The power to arrest the chief constable for obstructing me in my inquiries ten years after I left police was retained.

    The next test was early 90s when I asked New Zealand Police to help my inquiries. They did so. And provided me with the answers plus informed me that Scotland Yard Interpol Liaison section had tried to persuade NZ Police not to comply with my request. This is something IPCC inquiry may now be looking into re Met cover ups.

    Not long after the NZ Police helped I received a letter from a church in NZ. The church used by the decd who died Suffolk 1972. And whether NZ Police put them up to it I don’t know. But they, by whomsoever and in whatsoever way, “Charged” me again as the constable in the case to discharge my duty faithfully only unto law.

    After my legal advice 1982 it was seven years later I discovered new evidence. I contacted the solicitor who had even secured backup files at his home. His secretary said what a coincidence he has just been invited to public office as a District Judge so is ending his practice !

  11. dpack says:

    Another option is to avoid the filters and add one’s knowledge via one’s own blog or via well established and trustworthy blogs such as the needleblog rather than trusting important information to news sites or the main stream media which may well have their own agenda or hidden masters.

    The historical directorships of the british syrian society ltd makes rather interesting reading ,especially when extrapolated into the past or present and cross referenced to where ever the information might lead .

  12. dpack says:

    Another option is to avoid the filters and add one’s knowledge via one’s own blog or via well established and trustworthy blogs such as the needleblog rather than trusting important information to news sites or the main stream media which may well have their own agenda or hidden masters.

    The historical directorships of the british syrian society ltd makes rather interesting reading ,especially when extrapolated into the past or present and cross referenced to where ever the information might lead .

  13. Reblogged this on holliegreigjustice and commented:
    REBLOGGED

  14. Reblogged this on holliegreigjustice and commented:
    REBLOGGED

  15. Michael says:

    A fish rots from the head down, cops being bullied by cops, men being bought by men etc. No different to any other rank-led, oath-tied order. Subordinate role = subordinate attitude.

    Easy for me to say that sitting here typing at leisure and not looking down the barrel of a gun but blimey, this piece does read like a drum-roll of half-measures and self-pity. Not like an officer doesn’t know what kind of gang they’re joining from the get-go: “do swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, her heirs and successors” and all that cobblers.

    As a retired and angry ex-officer with a lifetime of experience in the force, please let us know what you would do differently if you could do it all again?

    • I’m not the author of the piece, merely the host, but in answer to your question, I made significant changes to the direction my career was headed in the late 80s, followed a path that suited ME, and saw out the remainder of my 30 years in a much happier frame of mind. Additionally the culture of the Police leadership needs to change drastically, it’s locked into an out-dated mode and needs to be kicked into line with the 21st Century

  16. Michael says:

    A fish rots from the head down, cops being bullied by cops, men being bought by men etc. No different to any other rank-led, oath-tied order. Subordinate role = subordinate attitude.

    Easy for me to say that sitting here typing at leisure and not looking down the barrel of a gun but blimey, this piece does read like a drum-roll of half-measures and self-pity. Not like an officer doesn’t know what kind of gang they’re joining from the get-go: “do swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, her heirs and successors” and all that cobblers.

    As a retired and angry ex-officer with a lifetime of experience in the force, please let us know what you would do differently if you could do it all again?

    • I’m not the author of the piece, merely the host, but in answer to your question, I made significant changes to the direction my career was headed in the late 80s, followed a path that suited ME, and saw out the remainder of my 30 years in a much happier frame of mind. Additionally the culture of the Police leadership needs to change drastically, it’s locked into an out-dated mode and needs to be kicked into line with the 21st Century

  17. l8in says:

    Reblogged this on L8in.

  18. l8in says:

    Reblogged this on L8in.

  19. bahktin says:

    The circumstances here are so extraordinary, the corruption is so systemic, revealing these crimes the official way doesn’t make sense. The world has changed though. Video testify on YouTube. Tell Exaro and others. Truth like this will spread worldwide in a day. Then you’re in the court of public opinion. People just want to know what happened. The tide has already turned. Truth tellers will be congratulated for their bravery. Prosecuting those people will become politically unappealing.

  20. bahktin says:

    The circumstances here are so extraordinary, the corruption is so systemic, revealing these crimes the official way doesn’t make sense. The world has changed though. Video testify on YouTube. Tell Exaro and others. Truth like this will spread worldwide in a day. Then you’re in the court of public opinion. People just want to know what happened. The tide has already turned. Truth tellers will be congratulated for their bravery. Prosecuting those people will become politically unappealing.

  1. August 12, 2014

    […] A Guest Blog by Chris Hobbs The issue in relation to possible, systematic child abuse by establishment figures, has, over the last forty years, been like a bad penny which has appeared time and time again only to be buried on each occasion by a…  […]

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